Chapter 1 THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND Introduction Life teaches each individual the very essence of living and likewise educates everybody on the standards on right ways to live

Chapter 1
THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND
Introduction
Life teaches each individual the very essence of living and likewise educates everybody on the standards on right ways to live. On the other hand, to live life at its full potential it has to be educated with the best strategies and methods to conquer all the circumstances which were inevitable in nature. The greatest weapon in combatting these dilemmas and the fast phasing world is Education. Through the years, global agencies, Non-governmental Organizations, governments of different countries and stakeholders were conducting assessments, measurements, evaluation and analysis on the status of education for children in a universal prospective. It is most of the time the main concern in all platforms and media all over the world. Hence, education for children has the main focus for the development of global competitiveness, economic development and socio-cultural trepidations.
Education for All (EFA) is an international initiative first launched in 1990 to bring the benefits of education to “every citizen in every society.” To realize this aim, a broad coalition of national governments, civil society groups, and development agencies such as UNESCO and the World Bank Group committed to achieving six specific education goals; Expand and improve comprehensive early childhood care and education, especially for the most vulnerable and disadvantaged children; Ensure that by 2015 all children, particularly girls, those in difficult circumstances, and those belonging to ethnic minorities, have access to and complete, free, and compulsory primary education of good quality; Ensure that the learning needs of all young people and adults are met through equitable access to appropriate learning and life-skills programs; Achieve a 50% improvement in adult literacy by 2015, especially for women, and equitable access to basic and continuing education for all adults; Eliminate gender disparities in primary and secondary education by 2005, and achieve gender equality in education by 2015, with a focus on ensuring girls’ full and equal access to and achievement in basic education of good quality; Improve all aspects of the quality of education and ensure the excellence of all so that recognized and measurable learning outcomes are achieved by all, especially in literacy, numeracy and essential life skills. In 2000, 189 countries and their partners adopted the two EFA goals that align with Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 2 and 3, which refer to universal primary education and gender parity. The World Bank recognizes that achieving these goals requires supporting the full EFA commitment.

Through these initiatives coming greatly from the situations of the children to those countries which educational management and systems were experiencing problems in educating all of them and aiming for “No children will be left behind in education” and to avoid factors of increase in drop-out rates, absenteeism, and tardiness for school children. A range of factors have been shown to increase a student’s risk of dropping out, including high rates of absenteeism, low levels of school engagement, low parental education, work or family responsibilities, problematic or deviant behavior, moving to a new school in the ninth grade, and attending a school with lower achievement scores (Child Trends, 2015). Dropping out from high school is associated with negative employment and life outcomes. Young people who drop out of high school are unlikely to have the minimum skills and credentials necessary to function in today’s increasingly complex society and technology-dependent workplace. The completion of high school is usually required for accessing post-secondary education, and is a minimum requirement for most jobs.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

Home-school is used throughout this thesis to denote the link between home and school; ‘home-school partnerships’ refers to the relationships between the parents and teachers (or school staff) regarding the children in their care (Walker, 2016). Home school reading was chosen as the vehicle for collaborative work and relationship development between parents and teachers, although any kind of ‘homework’ or ‘home-school learning’ could have been chosen.

The Home-School Learning Program(HSLP) is a major, mainstream, preventative strategy targeted at pupils at risk of not reaching their potential in the educational system because of background characteristics which tend to affect adversely pupil attainment and school retention. It focuses directly on the relevant adults in children’s educational lives in order that they may be better able to support the children’s attendance, participation and retention in the education system.
The Home-School Learning Program coordinator is a full time Department of Education (DepEd) teacher that works under the direct supervision of the school head to provide a link between home and school and actively works to strengthen that link for bilingual students and their parents/guardians. The teacher is deployed to undertake the duties during his/her schedule given by the school head. The coordinator focuses on addressing and prioritizing the educational needs of the students from disadvantaged communities, through the school support program, which includes a suite of interventions comprising in-school and out-of-school supports. HSLP Coordinator also requires to visit families and students, provide modules to students prepared by the subject teachers such as implementing literacy/numeracy initiatives.

It is at this context that the researcher targets to evaluate the Home-School Learning Program of public secondary schools in the municipality of Capas. This study will evaluate the Home-School Learning Program components such as program objectives, teachers, status of the modules and methods and strategies used in home schooling. This study will evaluate the components using Context, Input, Process and Product (CIPP) Evaluation Model. It will also seek to find out the problems in the implementation of home-schooling and measures to address the problems. Thus, this study may help the educators lessen drop-out rates and help student continue their academic competence.
Statement of the Problem
This study evaluated the implementation of Home-school Learning Program of public secondary schools in the municipality of Capas.

Specifically, it answered the following questions:
How is the Home-School Learning Program evaluated as to:
Inputs
Program Objectives
1.1.1.1 Objective Statements
Teachers
Trainings related to Home School
Specialization
Materials
Learning Materials/ Modules
Status of the Learning Materials/ Modules
Process
Methods and Strategies
Outcomes
Drop Out Rate
What are the needs and problems encountered by the teachers in the implementation of the program?
What plan of action could be proposed to address the problems encountered by the teachers?
What is the implication of the study to educational management?
Significance of the Study
The study “Implementation of Home-School Learning Program” can be a learning paradigm in the elementary and secondary level of public schools.
The findings of the study have a great value in helping the administrators, teachers, students, parents, and future researchers.

To the Administrator, this study will serve as a guide to the school administrators to address and prioritize the educational needs of the students from disadvantaged communities, students’ truancy, and students with health problems which includes a suite of interventions comprising in-school supports.

To the teachers, the study would provide additional information on how to adapt intervention with same problems encountered. The outcome of the study would result to better planning of home visitation, addressing and prioritizing the educational needs of the learners which would be for their benefits. This visit can also help teachers have a better understanding of the various strengths and challenges faced by each student and to meet the student and their family.

To the students, it is advantageous since the learners are the direct recipients of this study. The findings of this study will provide inputs on further development of the implementation of Home-School Learning Program. Moreover, with the efforts of the HSLP coordinator, school heads and teachers in implementing the program, students will become more motivated and encouraged to continue academic competence even in home setting.

To the parents, it is helpful because parents are not in worries that their child is subject from drop out. Parents can also monitor their child in their studies through home setting. Aside from the usual conduct of Home Room Parents- Teacher Association (HPTA) meeting, the study is significant in reaching out the parents as to what they could help in the total academic development of their child.

To the future researchers, this study can be used as a reference in the conduct of related researches. It can be a source of information and it offers an instrument that may serve as a basis for developing the future researchers’ own instrument.

Scope and Delimitation of the Study
The study focused on the evaluation of the implementation of Home-School Learning Program of public secondary schools in the municipality of Capas school year 2016-2017.

The study specifically determined the objectives of the program, teachers, learning materials, academic achievements of the learners and methods and strategies used in the implementation of Home-school learning program and the needs and problems encountered in the implementation of the program.
Definition of Terms
This study helped to facilitate better understanding of this research, the following terms are conceptually and/or operationally defined;
Grey Area. It refers to a remote or depress area or community.

Home-school education. Refers to the education of the student inside the home. Home education is usually conducted by a parent or tutor.
Home Visit. Refers as visit done by teachers at students’ home with their parents present. A home visit is also an informal opportunity for educators to engage with students to get to know them and their families well in their natural environment.

Modules. In the study, module pertains to the typically provide more practical student experiences than traditional learning systems. This also refers to an instructional unit that focuses on a particular topic.

Plan of Action. It pertains to the series of planned activities that address the problems that were determined from this study.

Recipient. It refers to the one who receives something from a giver. A recipient can receive a wide variety of things. (Merriam Webster). In the study, recipient pertains as students.

Stakeholder. A person, group or organization that has interest or concern in an organization that affects or be affected by the organization’s actions, objectives and policies.

5256488-572477
5229225-436245Chapter 2
REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES
This chapter dealt with the previous researches that were markedly connected to the present study. These literature and studies became an important basis in better understanding the study. The following related literatures and studies which are related to the present study are hereby presented as follows:
Related Literature
More than seventy years have passed since the twenty initial signatories to UNESCO’s Constitution proclaimed their belief in “full and equal opportunities for education for all” (UNESCO 1945, p. 2). This principle was reaffirmed three years later in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Article 26), which states unambiguously that “Everyone has the right to education” (UN 1948). There is no denying the advances which have been made since the Second World War in terms of access to education. To take just one key indicator – adult literacy – we can observe a dramatic progression from the 1950s, when UNESCO estimated that just a slight majority (55%) of the world’s population could be termed “literate” (UNESCO 1957), to the present day, when that same designation is applied to 86 per cent of humanity (UNESCO 2015). However, not even the greatest optimist would argue that we are anywhere close to realising the vision set out in 1945. Despite repeated initiatives and targets (notably at Jomtien in 1990 and Dakar in 2000, and with the Millennium Development Goals and Sustainable Development Goals), Education for All remains elusive. Is it simply that a vision of equal opportunity is no less utopian than one of wealth equally divided; that this pie we hope to slice more equitably is really just pie in the sky? The problem appears to lie with the fact that inequality – in education, as in other areas of human life – tends to be systemic rather than specific. Thus, “making inclusive education a reality requires transforming education systems in all their elements and processes across formal and non-formal education” (UNESCO 2013). And “system change” is a tricky business.

According to The Local Education Committee of Home, School, Community Liaison Scheme (1990), the underlying policy of the scheme is one that seeks to promote partnership between parents and teachers. The purpose of this partnership is to enhance pupils’ learning opportunities and to promote their retention in the education system. In addition, the HSCL Scheme places great emphasis on collaboration with the local community. The HSCL Scheme is the pioneer in involving the school in the life of the community and involving the community and its agencies in the life of the school. The Local Education Committee of the HSCL Scheme is central to this process of involvement. The HSCL Scheme has evolved, both theoretically and practically, over the years. Theory has informed practice and practice in turn has informed the theory.
Martin (2012) stated that homeschooling is a progressive movement around the country and the world, in which parents choose to educate their children at home instead of sending them to a traditional public or private school. Families choose to homeschool for a variety of reasons, including dissatisfaction with the educational options available, different religious beliefs or educational philosophies, and the belief that children are not progressing within the traditional school structure.
According to Holt (2007), they suggested homeschooling as an alternative educational option. There are more than two million children being homeschooled in the United States (US), with the percentage rapidly increasing percent each year. Homeschooling is legal in all states and in many foreign countries. Legal requirements for homeschooling in the U.S. vary from place to place. Some states have few or no requirements; others ask for portfolio reviews or standardized testing at certain intervals. The most important thing parents need to homeschool their children is to like them, enjoy their company, their physical presence, their energy, foolishness, and passion. They have to enjoy all their talk and questions, and enjoy equally trying to answer those questions.
A comprehensive survey of homeschooling in America. Provides insights into the emergence and growth of the movement, demographic characteristics of homeschoolers, motivation for homeschooling, strategies homeschooling parents employ to educate their children, and a current review of the scholarly literature on homeschooling. A credible interpretive framework for understanding the complexity of the movement is presented. (Murphy, Joseph. Homeschooling in America: Capturing and Assessing the Movement. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin, 2012.)
Stevens’s extensive observational research provides support for two qualitatively different kinds of homeschooling. The first one emphasizes an unstructured “unschooling” approach to education; the second, a more structured school-at-home approach. Stevens gives a credible and in-depth look at modern homeschooling in the United States, including growth of the movement, ideological divisions within it, organizational leadership, and motivation for homeschooling, and the importance of networks and support groups for homeschoolers. (Stevens, Mitchell L. Kingdom of Children: Culture and Controversy in the Homeschooling Movement. Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2001.)
Crucial to academic success, homeschooling has become a growing education phenomenon across the globe. It appears that, in the teaching and learning of homeschooling, the academic inputs and outcomes are ‘tangible’ for parents in tailoring their children’s needs in learning. A structured homeschooling has proven to be effective in improving academic success (Cogan, 2010; Harding, 2013; Rudner, 1999). However, many researchers argued the basis of this claim. The current body of literature seems to suffer from poor empirical knowledge base and evidences in justifying the effectiveness of homeschooling. Murphy (2014) summarizes that studies on overall impacts of homeschooling are still lacking.

Home schooling, not a present threat to public education, is nonetheless one of the forces that will change it. If the high estimates of the number of children in home schools (1.2 million) is correct, then the home-schooling universe is larger than the New York City public school system and roughly the size of the Los Angeles and Chicago public school systems combined. Even if the real number of home schoolers is more like 500,000, less than the lowest current estimate, there are more children home schooling than in charter schools and public voucher programs combined. Home schooling is not a new phenomenon. In colonial days families, including wealthy ones, educated their children at home, combining the efforts of parents, tutors, and older children. The rural one-room schoolhouse was created by families that banded together to hire a teacher who could substitute for parents but who would use the same mixture of direct instruction, tutoring, and mentoring by older students. (2018 The Brookings Institution)
Global perspective about “Education for All” is that, all children have the rights to be education despite of the status, citizenship, race and economical eminence. Because of the worldwide advocacy of the international, national and local on education and education is for everybody the local and national government units from different countries in the globe are working hand-in-hand in order to achieve the millennial goals for education. Most of the articles and literatures are focused on the development of home-schooling and its purposes for the children’s academic, economic, and socio-cultural development. It is reiterated mostly that home-schooling is one of the best remedial instructional system to help the depressed, not capable and non-capacitated individuals in formal schooling, however, interested and with willingness to achieve their educational goals.

Related Studies
A. Foreign
In the study of Rothermel, 2015, it is reiterated that there is solid evidence that homeschooling has made notable gains in absolute numbers and percent of the school-age population in nations as diverse as Australia, Brazil, Canada, England, Japan, Mexico, South Africa, South Korea, Scotland, and Russia Home education’s rebirth after about a century of quiescence has surprised many educators, sociologists, political scientists, historians, and theologians, and has captured the imagination and engagement of hundreds of thousands of families.

The study of Bryan Ray, 2012, reviews research on homeschool learner outcomes and then focuses on one study and one conceptual theme related to both home education and schooling in general. It synthesizes research on learner outcomes related to homeschooling in areas of students’ academic achievement, children’s social, emotional, and psychological development, and the success of adults who were home educated. The summary finds generally that positive outcomes on a variety of variables are associated with homeschooling. The first special focus is one study on African American homeschooling families that explores the parents’ reasons for homeschooling and their Black children’s academic achievement. The second particular focus is the issue of whether compulsory school attendance laws are necessary in light of the findings of research on teacher preparation and certification in state/public schools and three decades of research on modern homeschooling
The study of Matthews & Ewen (2006) “Home-based Interventions Program”, the early intervention programs have shown to be extremely effective with immigrant and refugee families. In fact, implementing the program has shown to be more effective for children of parents who do not speak English at home when compared to families who speak English at home. Numerous home visiting programs have been implemented to promote learning and resiliency in children of immigrant and refugee families during early childhood. Trained professionals educate parents about typical child development and teach them appropriate parenting skills. They teach their child through a standardized teaching curriculum that is directed by trained staff. The trained individuals are aware of the deficits of each child and complete tasks with the family to progress their learning. Concurrently, the parents are learning these strategies so they can continue to use them after the program finishes.
In the study of Johnson (2009) “Effectiveness of Home Visiting Programs for Child Development”, the advantages of home visiting programs have been researched extensively. Home visiting programs help parents miss fewer appointments because the interventions are at their home in a comfortable environment. It spares the family the extra stress of commuting to receive the intervention. Home visiting programs allow educated, trained individuals to work with children during these vital years to encourage school readiness, healthy parenting, and appropriate social and emotional development.

The study of Riley (2008) “Empowering Parents to support Literacy Development through Home-based Involvement” may do so by delivering training to parents at home. It allows for ease of access for those parents who do not have a means of transportation. Also, it is believed that by bringing the services to an environment where parents are most comfortable strong relationships are more easily fostered with those delivering the training. While recognizing the important role played by parents, such programs often encompass a broader range of topics beyond literacy, including the establishment of boundaries, rules and routines, and cognitive development. Whatever the program intent, the training that is delivered occurs in the confines of an environment familiar and controlled by the parent.
The study of Matthews & Ewen (2006), Johnson (2009), and Riley (2008) are all about home-based interventions program, home visiting programs, and home-based involvement. The study of Matthews & Ewen (2006) showed that the early intervention programs is extremely effective with immigrant and refugee families, it also showed that implementing the program is to be more effective for children of parents who do not speak English at home when compared to families who speak English at home. While, in the study of Johnson (2009) revealed the effectiveness of home visiting programs for child development, and the advantages of home visiting. On the other hand, the study of Riley (2008) reported the role and involvement of parents in the literacy development.
4114800190500000B. Local
A study conducted by Calaguas (2008) on the “Absenteeism Among Primary Grade Pupils of Tarlac Central District”, the study revealed that the factors that were identified as the causes of pupils’ absenteeism are as follow: 1) Family related- Causes along this line were: parents do not care at all; parents are always busy working so no extra time was given to them that’s why parents do not monitor their child educational status. 2.) Health related- The causes are the following: dental problems, weak resistance, suffer from asthma, allergies and other skin diseases and poor health conditions. 3.) Economic related- some pupils suffered financial problem. Among causes they identified were: low income of both parents that results to pupil not able to buy for the projects, cannot provide the needs of the pupil in school and limited daily allowance. 4.) Teacher related- Pupils noted that they were greatly affected when the teacher does not explain the lesson well, always unprepared to teach, always get angry and being inconsiderate.
Avellar (2014) in the study entitled “Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness Review” stated that home visiting reaches pregnant women and families with children birth through school-entry. Some are universal, while others target families at high risk for poor health, development, and economic outcomes. Most home visiting models have a structured protocol, materials, and goals. They use a combination of direct information sharing or service provision and case management with referral to community resources. Most address child health and development by focusing on parenting; for example, encouraging sensitive caregiving, increasing parent knowledge on development, or recognizing child illnesses.

Diamsay (2012) in a study on the “Evaluation of Alternative Learning System on Basic Literacy Program of the Department of Education” found that the study will make the ALS clienteles aware of the importance of being basically literate as they part of the community and they ought to understand current issues and problems as well as compute basic mathematical problems which would enable them to survive and actively participate in the community affairs. ALS classes are conducted at Community Learning Centers (CLCs). Students who are interested in enrolling in an ALS class are encouraged to visit the CLCs. They will be given an oral and written test to assess their competency level. If the applicant has not attended any formal schooling before, they will be enrolled in the Basic Literacy Program where they will be taught basic reading and computing skills before moving them to more advanced classes. Classes are usually held every day, although how many hours a day or how many days a week a student should show up for class depends on the ALS Coordinator.
Corpuz, Alma M., Herrera, Carmelita, Ladia, Ma. Agnes P., and Nool, Nelvin, 2013, conducted the study of “Impact Analysis of the School-based Community Development Modelling Program: The Case of Batangbatang, Tarlac City” in Barangay Batangbatang, Tarlac City as Tarlac State University had adopted the community for the development of the study. Among the salient findings, the services extended to the community comprised livelihood training skills for women; remedial reading and numeracy for pupils; values and sports development for pupils and out-of-school youths; home-making skills for women; gender and sensitivity seminar for all ages, personal and community hygiene and environmental cleanliness for all ages and groups.
The study of Tulio, Elvin M, 2013, explored the realities of the inclusion of students with disabilities into mainstream Physical Education classes in public secondary school in Capas, Tarlac from the perspective of the Physical Education teacher. The study explored valuable information to identify the existing inclusive practice at the public secondary schools in Capas, Tarlac. Positive attitudes toward appropriate teaching and learning for students with disabilities could improve the situation.
All the presented related studies were somehow similar to the present study. Their focus is towards the implementation and how to modify the home visitation program and the home school learning setting. The study is also similar to the present study for it identifies the same factors why students are always absent in school. However, the present study will also cover the needs and problems encountered by the teachers and HSLP coordinators in the implementation of the program.

Conceptual Framework
The study is represented by a diagrammatic representation below highlighting the important variables and aspects of the study to provide concrete flow on the conduct of the study.
The Home-School Learning Program (HSLP) will be evaluated by looking into its different areas of implementation such as the recipient, resources, frequency, methods and strategies, and level of achievement of the objectives of the program.

The study will also look into the needs problems encountered in the implementation of the program and based from the problems, the researcher will develop an action plan to address those problems.

Figure 1- Paradigm of the Study
27151673025INPUTS EVALUATION
1.Program Objectives
2. Teachers
3. Learning Modules
CONTEXT EVALUATION
Needs and problems encountered in the implementation of DCP
Implications to Educational Management
PROCESS
EVALUATION
Methods and Strategies
ds and Strategies
PRODUCT
EVALUATION
Drop-out Rate
Plan of Action
00INPUTS EVALUATION
1.Program Objectives
2. Teachers
3. Learning Modules
CONTEXT EVALUATION
Needs and problems encountered in the implementation of DCP
Implications to Educational Management
PROCESS
EVALUATION
Methods and Strategies
ds and Strategies
PRODUCT
EVALUATION
Drop-out Rate
Plan of Action

5111428-589915Chapter 3
METHODS OF STUDY AND SOURCES OF DATA
This chapter presented the methods that were utilized in the study. It gave discussions on the following: research design, instruments, procedure and statistical tools in analyzing and interpreting the data collected.

Research Design
This research evaluated the Implementation of the Home-school learning program of public secondary schools in the municipality of Capas, a division of Tarlac Province.

The study further used the CIPP model by Daniel Stufflebeam in 1983. The CIPP Model focuses on the collection of four different types of data to inform the decisions of organizational administrators. CIPP stands for Context, Input, Process and Product. Input evaluation concerns judgments about the resources needed to accomplish the program goals and objectives (Borg and Gall, 1992). In this study, input evaluation includes the recipient and the resources. Process evaluation involved the process needed for the implementation of the program. In this study, these includes the frequency, methods and strategies used in the implementation of the program.

Product evaluation focuses on the outcomes of a program or activity and helps administrators determine whether to continue, terminate, modify or refocus (Guskey, 2000). Output evaluation determines the extent the program objectives have been attained. The objectives by which the program will be evaluated are: dropout rate and the passing rate of the students.

Evaluators
The evaluators of the program were the class advisers who facilitated the home-schooling. The sample determined using the Purposive Sampling. Thus, the evaluators composed of 57 teachers, 6 teachers from Sta. Juliana High School, 9 from O’ Donnell High School Main, 1 teacher from Sta. Lucia High School, 16 teachers from Cristo Rey High School, 2 teachers from Aranguren Integrated High School, 2 teachers from Lawy High School, 2 teachers from Calangitan High School and 19 teachers from Capas High School.

Research Instrument
An evaluation scale utilized to gather data regarding modules, methods and strategies, program objective and problems encountered during the implementation of home-school. The instrument that were used in the study to monitor the implementation of the program was patterned based on the program monitoring tool and program objectives.
Research Procedure
A letter of permission to conduct the study was addressed to the school head. Upon approval, a letter for respondents was prepared to request their participation and cooperation in the study. The researcher went to different public secondary schools in the municipality of Capas to identify the facilitating teachers in home-school learning program.

Statistical Treatment
The data of the study was interpreted using frequency, percentage and means. Means will be obtained using the formula:
13115512678100X = ?fX/Nwhere f refers to the frequency of the item appeared, X is the index of responses.

In the output evaluation which is the level of attainment of the objectives of School based Home School Liaison, a Likert’s Scale will be used.

Point Scale Index Limit Descriptive Rating
5 4.5 – 5.0 Outstanding
4 3.5 – 4.4 Very Satisfactory
3 2.5 – 3.4 Satisfactory
2 1.5 – 2.4 Fair
1 1.0 – 1.4 Poor
For the mean level of the attainment of the objectives of the program, module evaluation, methods and strategies of home-school learning program and the 5 point Likert’s scale will be used. The mean level will be determined by getting the total of the observations divided by the total number of observation.
The sample mean will be computed using the formula:
X = EX/N
Frequency counts and rank will be used to present data on the problems encountered by the teachers in the implementation of the program.

Chapter 4
PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA
In this chapter presents the data gathered in the study. The purpose of this chapter is to present, analyse, and interpret the findings from various data and characteristics gathered by means of descriptive research.

Age of the Teachers conducting the Home- school learning program
`Chart 1 contains the ages of teaching and implementing forces of the home- school learning program in the implementing school where the researcher had conducted the study.

Pie chart 1 shows the ages ranges of the teachers in the implementing school where home- school learning program study had been conducted. The highest range for the ages of the teachers in 35-44 with a frequency of 21 and it is 37% of the total number of the teacher respondents. Second is the 25-34 range with a total tallied frequency of 19 which composed the 33% of all the teacher respondents in the study. The lowest range is the retiring stage which is 55-64 with 3 counts composing the 5% of the group.

Teachers who are implementing the program are in the middle-aged class in which the experiences in teaching were highly recommended.

Marital Status of the implementing teachers of the Home- school learning program of the Department of Education.

Chart 2 indicates the status in terms of the marital stage of the teaching forces implementing the home- school learning program in the implementing school where the study was conducted.

Pie Chart 2 displays the frequency and the mean of the marital status of the teachers implementing the home- school learning program. It is further indicated that 39% of the teachers with the frequency of 22 teachers were single. In addition, 61% of the teacher respondents with the frequency of 35 were married.

The teachers which were given the assignment of teaching the Home-schooling as an alternative learning are mostly married which gave the impression that parental implication should also be considered in the selection of the implementing teachers of the program.
Program Objectives
Table 1 represents the objectives of the Home- school learning program of the Department of Education with the satisfactory level rated by the teachers and students as respondents. To develop an effective and efficient program; correctly stated and well-planned objectives should be considered with a very high achievement possibility and probability. Objectives are essentials in planning activities which can help to organize the content while evaluating the pre-activities and post activities for a very rate of success.

Table 1
Objectives of the Home- school Learning Program
PROGRAM OBJECTIVES Mean Adjectival Description
1. Makes education accessible to all. 4.02 Very Satisfactory
2. Improves the quality of life of individuals. 3.91 Very Satisfactory
3. Strengthens the partnership of the school and the community. 4.11 Very Satisfactory
4. Child’s development of potential is observed for his/her growth and development outside formal system. 3.88 Very Satisfactory
5. The parents’ recognition of their complementary/supplementary role in the education of the children is well-manifested. 3.49 Satisfactory
6. Provides literacy, numeracy and lifelong skills through an alternative system of teaching and learning. 3.88 Very Satisfactory
7.  The program promotion on the talents, interests, and skills of the children became a self-propelling, fulfilled, and contributing members of the community. 3.28 Satisfactory
8. The program lessens the dropout rate. 4.05 Very Satisfactory
9. Students continue his/her academic competence. 3.70 Very Satisfactory
10. Helps pupils who are enrolled but habitual/ seasonal absentees. 3.96 Very Satisfactory
11. Addresses the issue of congestion, 3.91 Very Satisfactory
12. Promoting equal access and opportunity for learning 3.81 Very Satisfactory
Grand Mean 3.83 Very Satisfactory
Table 1 shows objectives of the home- school learning program implemented in Tarlac Province with the level of satisfactory as evaluated by the respondents of the study. Furthermore, the objective “Strengthens the partnership of the school and the community” got the highest mean with the intertwined results of both student and teacher respondents and rated it 4.11 with an adjectival description of “very satisfactory”. The next highest rating is 4.05 mean for the “The program lessens the dropout rate” objective with an adjectival description of “very satisfactory”. Thirdly, is the objective “Makes education accessible to all” with a mean of 4.02 and a description of “very satisfactory”. Moreover, the respondents rated the objective “The program promotion on the talents, interests, and skills of the children became a self-propelling, fulfilled, and contributing members of the community” with the mean of 3.28 and an adjectival description of “satisfactory”.
The Department of Education is continuously improving program for the development of the curriculum and the educational system as a whole in the Philippines. However, they should be focusing the program in accordance with the promotion of the talents, interest, skills of the school children and intensify the emphasis of this domain for the betterment of the program. Respondents are very aware of the happenings in the implementation of the home- school learning program that is why they are observing every detail even in the evaluation of the objectives if these are achievable or not.
Though the goal of the Department of Education for the Alternative Delivery Mode for those who cannot afford to go to formal schooling, the respondents are hoping that the program should state a more precise and more attainable objectives for the high rating of success and the respondents are also hoping that all the concerns should addressed by assessment coming from the higher authorities.

Teachers facilitating the Home- school Learning Program
Table 2 shows the corresponding gender frequencies of the facilitating teachers of the home- school learning program.

Table 2
Number of teachers Facilitating Home-schooling
Schools MaleFrequency Mean Female Frequency Mean Total
Sta. Juliana 1 2% 5 9% 6
O’ Donnell High School 0 0% 9 16% 9
Sta. Lucia High School 0 0% 1 2% 1
Cristo Rey High School 5 9% 11 19% 16
Aranguren Integrated School 0 0% 2 4% 2
Lawy High School 0 0% 2 4% 2
Capas High School 7 12% 12 21% 19
Calangitan High School 0 0% 2 4% 2
TOTAL 13 23% 44 77% 57
Table 2 exhibits the total number of the implementing teachers of the participating schools for this study with the corresponding genders. Moreover, it is showing that in the male category that most number of the teachers were in Capas High School with a total frequency of 7 that was rated 12% of the male respondents. Secondly, Cristo Rey High School has 5 male teachers implementing the program which is rated 9% of the male category and in Sta. Juliana with 1 male teacher that is 2% of the male teachers. The total range of the male teachers is 23% of the respondents of the study. Nonetheless, 57% of the facilitating teachers of the Home-school program were female teachers.

Hence, female teachers are the most considered to participate in the implementation of the home- school learning program which indicates that female teachers can impose a motherly care for the school children undergoing the said program.

Length of service
Experience in teaching is one of the most considered factors in designating the teachers to implement the home- school learning program for the better enactment of the said platform. Teachers should also have enough knowledge in doing the alternative strategies and methods in order for the implementers to not have a hard time in explaining the program for the fast mode delivery of the said endeavor.

Pie chart 3 demonstrates the length of service of the teachers implementing the program which made them to be qualified in teaching in the home- school learning program. The highest range among the indicators is 6-10 years which has a frequency of 15 that is 26% of the total of 57 respondents. Next in line is the 11-15 years in service range which covered the 23% of the total amount of the respondents. Lastly, there was no teacher with less than a year in service.

The implication of this result is that the implementers are considering most of the time the length of service of the teachers for the execution of the program due to highly sensitive tasks for the better carrying out of the said program.

5.1 Trainings related to home schooling attended/executed by the Teachers

Chart 4 interjects the pieces of trainings related to home- school learning program of the teachers. Including with the length of service of teachers are the pieces of trainings and workshops which they had attended and activities they are executing in relation with the program.

Pie Chart 4 displays the training attended by the teachers for the strengthening program of the Home-schooling as an alternative educational solution for the non-capacitated students for the formal education. In the table it is showed that most of the teachers were engaged in the in-service trainings conducted in the local vicinity of the school which were usually executed during the proportional vacation of the teachers which had counted 34 frequency out of the 57 respondents which rated this indicator with 60%. Next in this indicator is the SLAC Session with an average score of 28% with a total frequency of 16 teachers. And the lowest percentage were resulted to the district and national training with no tallied scores.

School-based trainings are the most affordable and the easiest mode of implementing training programs for the continuous development of the professional aspects of the teachers. Because of the convenience in many terms the school administration always chooses to have the local trainings.
The specialization of subjects of the respondents
Chart 5 shows the frequency distribution of the teachers with the subject specialization which gave implication in the study’s result.

Pie Chart 5 displays the specialization of the teachers according to the subjects they are teaching in the home- school learning program as an alternative mode of teaching the out-of-school children. Modal frequency for the subjects was raised in the results of the distribution of the variables like; English, Filipino and TLE with a mode of 9 frequency and with a percentage of 16; Science and Mathematics with a mode of 7 frequency with a 12% rate; MAPEH/PE and Araling Panlipunan with a mode of 6 frequency with a total percentage of 11 and the subject Edukasyon sa Pagpapakatao with a frequency of 4 with a 7% rating.

Learning Materials
7.1 Grade 7-10 Learning Materials
Table 3 displays the status of the learning materials from grade 7-10 as of the report from the school heads of the schools implementing the home- school learning program.

Table 3
Status of Learning Materials in Grade 7-10
Learners’ Materials Status
English Not enough
Filipino Not enough
Science Not enough
Mathematics Not enough
Araling PanlipunanNot enough
ESP Not enough
TLE Not enough
MAPEH Not enough
Table 3 shows the status of learning materials in the schools implementing the home- school learning program as of the report coming from the school heads of each school. It is clear and palpable that the learning materials were not enough in terms of numerical description and in adjectival description of the reports of the schools implementing the said program. Moreover, the schools are strongly affirm that the materials where only provided by the school coming from the teachers facilitating the program and the school MOOE.

Learning materials are essential and should be given focus for the intensification of the program and for the benefit of the implementers and the clienteles.

Evaluation of the Learning Materials
8.1 Objectives
Table 4 displays the indicators of the rating of the implementers, facilitating teachers and participating students and the results of the evaluation of the objectives of the learning materials distributed to the clients.

Table 4
Evaluation of Objectives of the Learning Materials
Indicators Mean Adjectival Description
1.       Syllabus includes basic elements of the course (e.g., course title, credits, goals/objectives, learning outcomes, prerequisites, course description) 4.25 Very Satisfactory
2.       Learning objectives are stated clearly and written from the student’s perspective. 4.05 Very Satisfactory
3.       The course learning objectives are specific, measurable, attainable, result-oriented and time-bounded. 3.96 Very Satisfactory
4.       The learning objectives are appropriately designed for the level of the course. 3.89 Very Satisfactory
5.       Objectives are directive and with authority for proper dissemination. 4.04 Satisfactory
6.       Curriculum guide is provided for the references of the lessons. 4.25 Satisfactory
7.       Course texts (required and optional) are listed on syllabus; supplementary materials and resources are provided if appropriate. 3.98 Very Satisfactory
Grand Mean 4.06 Very Satisfactory
Table 4 shows the rating imposed by the evaluators composing the implementers, facilitating teachers and the participating students including the results of the evaluation. The highest rating of 4.25 mean with an adjectival description of “very satisfactory” was distributed in two indicators which were “Syllabus includes basic elements of the course (e.g., course title, credits, goals/objectives, learning outcomes, prerequisites, course description)” and the “Curriculum guide is provided for the references of the lessons”. Next in the list is the indicator/objective “Learning objectives are stated clearly and written from the student’s perspective” with a mean rating of 4.05 and a description of “very satisfactory”. Nonetheless, the lowest rating of 3.89 was given to the indicator/objective “The learning objectives are appropriately designed for the level of the course” with an adjectival rating of “very satisfactory”.

According to the respondents the objectives of the learning materials were clearly stated, specific, measureable, attainable and result-oriented which made them understand the contents of the materials and use these materials accordingly. The respondents were satisfied with the objectives because they can foresee the function of the materials for the proper implementation of the home- school learning program for the out-of-school youths. In addition, the respondents had vividly understood the purpose of the materials because of the objectives of the materials.

8.2 Pre-assessment
Table 5 shows the indicators of the rating of the implementers, facilitating teachers and participating students and the results of the evaluation of the pre-assessment of the learning materials distributed to the clients.

Table 5
Evaluation of the Pre-assessment of the Learning Materials
Indicators Mean Adjectival Description
1. Prior knowledge is summarized before beginning the module 3.49 Very Satisfactory
2. Prior knowledge is tested before beginning the module and has effect on module presentation 3.51 Very Satisfactory
3. Student is provided with feedback during and after assessment 3.67 Very Satisfactory
4. Clear directions for assessment(s) are provided. 4.30 Very Satisfactory
5. Table of Specifications serves as a guide for measurement. 3.44 Satisfactory
6. Guideline were specified for the guidance of the learners. 3.44 Satisfactory
7. The questions were derived from the curriculum guide. 3.86 Very Satisfactory
8.       Grading policy is clearly defined for the assessment(s). 3.77 Very Satisfactory
Grand Mean 3.69 Very Satisfactory
Table 5 exhibits the result of the evaluation of the respondents in the pre-assessment implemented in the learning materials for the home- school learning program. The respondents had rated the pre-assessment which is clearly stated directions for the easier understanding of the students with a mean rating of 4.30 that very satisfactory for the evaluators. Moreover, the evaluators had also deliberated that the questions were clearly deliberated for the curriculum guide which rated this indicator with 3.86 and the respondents were very satisfied with this situation. However, some of the respondents were quite doubtful of the assessments’ articulation with the table of specifications and parallelism of the guidelines to the guidance of the learners which rated these indicators with 3.44 in which they were only satisfied.
In overall ratings, the respondents were very satisfied with the pre-assessment most especially the implementers and the facilitating teachers for them to better implement the program with the clienteles. It is very important to make a pre-assessment clear, specific and suited to the learners in order to address some problems that may arise in the near future.

Content
Table 6 shows the indicators of the rating of the implementers, facilitating teachers and participating students and the results of the evaluation of the content of the learning materials distributed to the clients.

Table 6
Evaluation of the Content of the Learning Materials
Indicators Mean Adjectival Description
1.       Content is presented in slide or text format 4.72 Outstanding
2.       Topics are clearly delivered 4.32 Very Satisfactory
3.       Topics are easy to understand by the learner 3.70 Very Satisfactory
4.       Graphics are included with the content 3.75 Very Satisfactory
5.       Images contain descriptive text 3.79 Very Satisfactory
6.       Content has fixed entry and exit point, students cannot navigate to specific pages. 3.95 Very Satisfactory
7.       Glossary terms are linked from the content 3.40 Satisfactory
8.       The sentences and paragraphs were grammatically correct and has no margin of errors. 4.35 Very Satisfactory
9.       The content organization and design are clear, coherent, and structured in an appropriate way. 3.47 Satisfactory
10.   Concepts and skills build logically and purposefully throughout the course, with transitions to support development and understanding from skill to skill. 3.77 Very Satisfactory
Grand Mean 3.92 Very Satisfactory
Table 6 displays the result of the evaluation of the content of the materials of the utilized in accordance with the implementation of the home- school learning program. Content of the materials is the most important factors in order to have a more effective and more efficient result with high probability of success. The respondents as evaluators were very particular with the content of the materials which made them came up with an outstanding evaluation with the presentation of the text of the materials with a rate of 4.72 mean. The evaluators considered also the most is the sentence and paragraphs structure with correct grammar and low margin of errors which they were impressed that is why a rating of 4.35 mean was resulted. However, they had given the linkage of glossary from the content a satisfactory rating only with a mean of 3.40.

In evaluating the content, the respondents were very particular with the understandability and structural analysis of the sentence patterns for the betterment of the learnings that the learners can accumulate.
Activities/Assignments
Table 7 shows the indicators of the rating of the implementers, facilitating teachers and participating students and the results of the evaluation of the activities/assignments of the learning materials distributed to the clients.

Table 7
Evaluation of the Activities/Assignments of the Learning Materials
Indicators Mean Adjectival Description
1. Surveys and quizzes are included as assignments. 3.68 Very Satisfactory
2. Papers and essays are included as assignments. 3.82 Very Satisfactory
3. Activities are most-likely based on reality. 4.18 Very Satisfactory
4.  Activities are creatively conducted to enhance the children’s critical thinking skills. 4.09 Very Satisfactory
5. Quizzes are included with multiple question types. 2.61 Satisfactory
Grand Mean 3.68 Very Satisfactory
Table 7 reveals the evaluation result of the activities/assignments imposed in the learning materials distributed with the learners. Activities which are practical and reality-based were the most essential considerations that the evaluators are looking for that is why they had rated the indicator “Activities are most-likely based on reality” with the highest mean of 4.18 and an adjectival description of “very satisfactory”. Due to the importance of creativity which can enhance the critical thinking of the children the respondents rated second highest the indicator “Activities are creatively conducted to enhance the children’s critical thinking skills” with the rating of 4.09 and adjectival rating of “very satisfactory”. Lastly, the respondents had rated the lowest the indicator “Quizzes are included with multiple question types” with a rating of 2.61 and it is satisfactory in adjectival rating.

Post-assessment
Table 8 shows the indicators of the rating of the implementers, facilitating teachers and participating students and the results of the evaluation of the post-assessments of the learning materials distributed to the clients.

Table 8
Evaluation of the Post-assessment of the Learning Materials
Indicators Mean Adjectival Description
1.       Assessment is given in or outside of the module. 3.61 Very Satisfactory
2.       Assessments occur as self-test, quiz prior to the module. 3.72 Very Satisfactory
3.       Assessments occur as self-test, quiz during the module. 3.72 Very Satisfactory
4.       Assessments occur as self-test, quiz after the module. 3.98 Very Satisfactory
5.       Several assessment types are included. 3.49 Very Satisfactory
6.       With each assessment, feedback is provided for each question. 3.23 Satisfactory
Grand Mean 3.62 Very Satisfactory
Table 8 displays the result of the evaluation of the respondents in the post-assessment imposed in the learning materials for the clienteles. Appearance of the post-assessment for the evaluation of the students’ learning and retention is important in order to gauge the learners to strive more. The evaluation of the post-assessment implicated that the quiz after the modules were involved which was rated 3.98 mean and a very satisfactory adjectival description. Next in the list is are the appearance of the self-test during and prior to the module with a rating of 3.72 mean and a very satisfactory description. Further, the respondents noticed that not all the assessment is with feedback section for further assessment with a rating of 3.23 and a satisfactory description.

Post-assessment gave an impression of importance because according to the respondents these will indicate the next strategies and methods to be used for the next lesson or to prepare remediation for the previous lesson. It is the signal if the lesson is still needed to be continued or pause for a while a make some remedial instructions.

Methods and Strategies
Table 9 displays the most effective methods and strategies to be used for the development of the implementation of the home- school learning program.

Table 9
Methods and Strategies of the Teachers
Indicators Mean Adjectival Description
1. Employs individual study plans for students working at different levels. 3.61 Very Satisfactory
2. Motivates students to achieve learning tasks and competencies every grading period. 3.72 Very Satisfactory
3. Collaborates with other subject area teachers for effective home schooling schemes. 3.72 Very Satisfactory
4. Enhances and assesses proper test materials properly that corresponds to the learner’s achievement. 3.96 Very Satisfactory
5. Properly disseminates to the parents their tasks for the pursuant of the program. 3.49 Very Satisfactory
6. Provides quality informal education for the development of the skills as needed by the home schoolers. 3.75 Very Satisfactory
7. Achieves the program objectives which were specified in it per se. 3.60 Very Satisfactory
8. Discusses program activities and objectives with parents and students. 4.23 Very Satisfactory
9. Conducts home visitation regularly according to schedule 3.21 Satisfactory
10. Recognizes learner’s prior learnings and experiences 3.58 Very Satisfactory
11. Assesses special skills by demonstration of knowledge and abilities 3.49 Satisfactory
12. Sets learning agreement of competencies to be covered 3.88 Very Satisfactory
13. Adopts flexible learning styles 3.49 Satisfactory
14. Checks learning portfolio to track learning pace and progress 4.14 Very Satisfactory
15. Encourage the students to visit the school according to schedule 4.61 Outstanding
Grand Mean 3.77 Very Satisfactory
Table 14 shows the importance of transcendence of the methods and strategies in order to achieve a high rate of success in the implementation of the home- school learning program. In addition, this table was evaluated by the respondents in which strategy or method is the most effective, which came up with the strategy “Encourage the students to visit the school according to schedule” with a very high rating of 4.61 mean and a description of outstanding. Next in the list of the most effective and conducive strategy or method is the “Discusses program activities and objectives with parents and students” with a rating of 4.23 mean which is impressive in the description of “very satisfactory”. “Conducts home visitation regularly according to schedule” has the least rating among the indicators which was rated 3.21 only and with a “satisfactory” description.
Methods and strategies in accordance with the interviews conducted by the researcher, the respondents have so many considerations in order to encourage and motivate the students to attend sessions. It is clearly stated that regular attendance of the students is still the most effective to acquire the most learnings they need to level up.

Needs and Problems
Table 10 shows the needs and problems which were identified by the researcher as a result of the conduct of the study in the participating school resulted to classify according to the intensity of the grievance. The items were identified accordingly with a ranking method. Problems were classified upon the interviews and surveys conducted by the researcher upon the recommendation coming from the teachers and implementers of the program per se. Furthermore, the problems were also evaluated by the researcher to come up with a precise and more specific context for the benefit of the researcher and the respondents as well.

Table 10
Needs and Problems Encountered
NEEDS AND PROBLEMS IN HOME SCHOOL LEARNING PROGRAM f % Rank
Intensive trainings are insufficient for the development of the program. 43 75.44% 1
Difficulty in conducting Follow up Home Visitation due to distance and transportation. 42 73.68% 2
No time to visit the learner due to teaching schedule. 39 68.42% 3
Budgetary requirements are not yet mandatory for the inclusion in the budget of the school. 38 66.67% 4
Lack of skill or knowledge of the students in answering the activities. 37 64.91% 5
Implementers are no longer monitoring the day to day activities of the clients. 36 63.16% 6
Insufficient number of Learning Modules. 34 59.65% 7
Lack of Interest and willingness of the student. 29 50.88% 8
Students are engaged to other non-educative activities like having a job/work. 27 47.37% 9
Lack of funds for the program. 26 45.61% 10
Modules are complex and highfalutin which cannot meet the level of the learners. 25 43.86% 11
Parents are not interested with the program. 21 36.84% 12
Facilities are no longer included due to neglect of the implementers. 19 33.33% 13
No replacement for the condemned modules. 18 31.58% 14
Parents are not properly oriented and inculcated of the importance of the program. 15 26.32% 15
Table 10 displays the ranking of the needs and problems according to the intensity and as observed by the respondents which are also needed to be addressed to the authorities. The top most problem in the implementation of the program according to the result of the conduct of the study is the “Intensive trainings are insufficient for the development of the program” which 75.44% of the respondents agreed that this indicator is a problem. Ranking the second is the “Difficulty in conducting Follow up Home Visitation due to distance and transportation” with the rating of 73.68% of the respondents is in favor that it is a problem. Thirdly, is the “No time to visit the learner due to teaching schedule” with the rate of 68.42% of the respondents had agreed that this indicator ranked 3.

Problems encountered by both of the teachers and students were identified by the researcher which was taken into consideration the situation of the implementation of the home- school learning program of the Department of Education. These problems hinder the full success of the Program implementation and may be addressed to the authorities. The respondents especially the facilitating teachers have a hard time to discuss the problems to the implementers because some schools are prioritizing the program the least among the activities and programs. Budgetary requirements and clear financial support from the implementers were not the priority which weakens the home- school learning program. More dilemma may arise if these needs and problems will be addressed to the proper authorities.

Implication of the study to Educational Management?
Education for All is a global mandate to all the member countries of the United Nations which is likewise applicable to non-members. Philippines is one the member countries in the United Nations, hence, it is a must for the government to do actions in order to comply with this global concern. In good faith and for public governance the Philippine government through the Department of Education had come up with the programs which will suffice the need of education of those who are incapable of the formal education provided by the government and mandated by the law. Alternative Learning System and Alternative Delivery Mode are just a few of the programs which were conducted in order to lessen if not eradicate in abrupt the dropped-out rate and out-of-school youths.
Home- school learning program is likewise an alternative way to deliver education in every Filipino student who cannot afford, cannot resume and those who are depressed because of some inevitable circumstances. This study will give information and provide data on the before, during and after assessment and evaluation of this program for better scrutiny of the people in authority together with the experts, e.g. curriculum developers and educational management officials. Furthermore, this study will open then minds of the key officials on the mode of delivery of the program and may provide deeper understanding of the arisen problems and needs in the implementation of the program. This study can also provide solutions in order to help the educational managers in conducting the program more comprehensively and effectively for the development of the program.

Hence, this study can provide solutions to the problems which were encountered by the curriculum developers and implementers of the educational programs. An educational system which is developed hand-in-hand by the developers, implementers, clienteles and the stakeholders will build a stronger program for the enhancement with results of the educational system in the Philippines.

Chapter 5SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION
This chapter presents the Summary of Findings, Conclusion and Recommendations done by the researcher. The results of the study are summarize and come up with conclusions and formulate recommendations for the betterment of the study.

Summary of Findings
Age of the Teachers conducting the Home-schooling Program
`The highest range for the ages of the teachers in 35-44 with a frequency of 21 and it is 37% of the total number of the teacher respondents. Second is the 25-34 range with a total tallied frequency of 19 which composed the 33% of all the teacher respondents in the study. The lowest range is the retiring stage which is 55-64 with 3 counts composing the 5% of the group.

Marital Status of the implementing teachers of the Home-schooling program of the Department of Education.

As of the marital status of the teacher respondents, 39% of the teachers with the frequency of 22 teachers were single. In addition, 61% of the teacher respondents with the frequency of 35 were married.

Program Objectives
The objective “Strengthens the partnership of the school and the community” got the highest mean with the intertwined results of both student and teacher respondents and rated it 4.11 with an adjectival description of “very satisfactory”. The next highest rating is 4.05 mean for the “The program lessens the dropout rate” objective with an adjectival description of “very satisfactory”. Thirdly, is the objective “Makes education accessible to all” with a mean of 4.02 and a description of “very satisfactory”. Moreover, the respondents rated the objective “The program promotion on the talents, interests, and skills of the children became a self-propelling, fulfilled, and contributing members of the community” with the mean of 3.28 and an adjectival description of “satisfactory”.
Teachers facilitating the Home-schooling Program
The male category the most number of the teachers were in Capas High School with a total frequency of 7 that was rated 12% of the male respondents. Secondly, Cristo Rey High School has 5 male teachers implementing the program which is rated 9% of the male category and in Sta. Juliana with 1 male teacher that is 2% of the male teachers. The total range of the male teachers is 23% of the respondents of the study. Nonetheless, 57% of the facilitating teachers of the Home-school program were female teachers.

The specialization of subjects of the respondents
Modal frequency for the subjects was raised in the results of the distribution of the variables like; English, Filipino and TLE with a mode of 9 frequency and with a percentage of 16; Science and Mathematics with a mode of 7 frequency with a 12% rate; MAPEH/PE and Araling Panlipunan with a mode of 6 frequency with a total percentage of 11 and the subject Edukasyon sa Pagpapakatao with a frequency of 4 with a 7% rating.

Length of service
The highest range among the indicators is 6-10 years which has a frequency of 15 that is 26% of the total of 57 respondents. Next in line is the 11-15 years in service range which covered the 23% of the total amount of the respondents. Lastly, there was no teacher with less than a year in service.

4.1 Trainings related to home schooling attended/executed by the Teachers
Most of the teachers were engaged in the in-service trainings conducted in the local vicinity of the school which were usually executed during the proportional vacation of the teachers which had counted 34 frequency out of the 57 respondents which rated this indicator with 60%. Next in this indicator is the SLAC Session with an average score of 28% with a total frequency of 16 teachers. And the lowest percentage were resulted to the district and national training with no tallied scores.

Status Learning Materials
It is clear and palpable that the learning materials were not enough in terms of numerical description and in adjectival description of the reports of the schools implementing the said program. Moreover, the schools are strongly affirm that the materials where only provided by the school coming from the teachers facilitating the program and the school MOOE.

Evaluation of the Learning Materials
Objectives
The highest rating of 4.25 mean with an adjectival description of “very satisfactory” was distributed in two indicators which were “Syllabus includes basic elements of the course (e.g., course title, credits, goals/objectives, learning outcomes, prerequisites, course description)” and the “Curriculum guide is provided for the references of the lessons”. Next in the list is the indicator/objective “Learning objectives are stated clearly and written from the student’s perspective” with a mean rating of 4.05 and a description of “very satisfactory”. Nonetheless, the lowest rating of 3.89 was given to the indicator/objective “The learning objectives are appropriately designed for the level of the course” with an adjectival rating of “very satisfactory”.

8.2 Pre-assessment
The respondents had rated the pre-assessment which is clearly stated directions for the easier understanding of the students with a mean rating of 4.30 that very satisfactory for the evaluators. Moreover, the evaluators had also deliberated that the questions were clearly deliberated for the curriculum guide which rated this indicator with 3.86 and the respondents were very satisfied with this situation. However, some of the respondents were quit doubtful of the assessments’ articulation with the table of specifications and parallelism of the guidelines to the guidance of the learners which rated these indicators with 3.44 in which they were only satisfied.
8.3 Content
Content of the materials is the most important factors in order to have a more effective and more efficient result with high probability of success. The respondents as evaluators were very particular with the content of the materials which made them came up with an outstanding evaluation with the presentation of the text of the materials with a rate of 4.72 mean. The evaluators considered also the most is the sentence and paragraphs structure with correct grammar and low margin of errors which they were impressed that is why a rating of 4.35 mean was resulted. However, they had given the linkage of glossary from the content a satisfactory rating only with a mean of 3.40.

8.4 Activities/Assignments
Activities which are practical and reality-based were the most essential considerations that the evaluators are looking for that is why they had rated the indicator “Activities are most-likely based on reality” with the highest mean of 4.18 and an adjectival description of “very satisfactory”. Due to the importance of creativity which can enhance the critical thinking of the children the respondents rated second highest the indicator “Activities are creatively conducted to enhance the children’s critical thinking skills” with the rating of 4.09 and adjectival rating of “very satisfactory”. Lastly, the respondents had rated the lowest the indicator “Quizzes are included with multiple question types” with a rating of 2.61 and it is satisfactory in adjectival rating.

8.5 Post-Assessment
The evaluation of the post-assessment implicated that the quiz after the modules were involved which was rated 3.98 mean and a very satisfactory adjectival description. Next in the list is are the appearance of the self-test during and prior to the module with a rating of 3.72 mean and a very satisfactory description. Further, the respondents noticed that not all the assessment is with feedback section for further assessment with a rating of 3.23 and a satisfactory description.

Methods and Strategies
The strategy or method which is rated most effective is the “Encourage the students to visit the school according to schedule” with a very high rating of 4.61 mean and a description of outstanding. Next in the list of the most effective and conducive strategy or method is the “Discusses program activities and objectives with parents and students” with a rating of 4.23 mean which is impressive in the description of “very satisfactory”. “Conducts home visitation regularly according to schedule” has the least rating among the indicators which was rated 3.21 only and with a “satisfactory” description.
Needs and Problems
The top most problem in the implementation of the program according to the result of the conduct of the study is the “Intensive trainings are insufficient for the development of the program” which 75.44% of the respondents agreed that this indicator is a problem. Ranking the second is the “Difficulty in conducting Follow up Home Visitation due to distance and transportation” with the rating of 73.68% of the respondents is in favor that it is a problem. Thirdly, is the “No time to visit the learner due to teaching schedule” with the rate of 68.42% of the respondents had agreed that this indicator ranked 3.

CONCLUSION
Age of the Teachers conducting the Home-schooling Program
`The teachers who are implementing the program are in the middle-aged class in which the experiences in teaching were highly recommended.

Marital Status of the implementing teachers of the Home-schooling program of the Department of Education.

The teachers which were given the assignment of teaching the Home-schooling as an alternative learning are mostly married which gave the impression that parental implication should also be considered in the selection of the implementing teachers of the program.
Program Objectives
Through the survey and interviews conducted by the researcher, through the goal of the Department of Education for the Alternative Delivery Mode for those who cannot afford to go to formal schooling, the respondents are hoping that the program should state a more precise and more attainable objectives for the high rating of success and the respondents are also hoping that all the concerns should addressed by assessment coming from the higher authorities.

Teachers facilitating the Home-schooling Program
Female teachers are the most considered to participate in the implementation of the Home-schooling program which indicates that female teachers can impose a motherly care for the school children undergoing the said program.

The specialization of subjects of the respondents
Facilitating teachers do not teach all the subjects by the specialization that they are teaching. Because of the need of the students the facilitating teachers are forced to teach subjects which were out of their specialization.

Learning Materials
Learning materials were not enough and insufficient for the learners’ need in order to achieve the goals and objectives of the program. It is more important for the implementers to monitor the learning materials for the development of the program.
Length of service
The implication of this result is that the implementers are considering most of the time the length of service of the teachers for the execution of the program due to highly sensitive tasks for the better carrying out of the said program.

Trainings related to home schooling attended/executed by the Teachers

As of the interview conducted by the researchers, the school-based trainings are the most affordable and the easiest mode of implementing training programs for the continuous development of the professional aspects of the teachers. Because of the convenience in many terms the school administration always chooses to have the local trainings.
Evaluation of the Learning Materials
8.1 Objectives
According to the respondents the objectives of the learning materials were clearly stated, specific, measureable, attainable and result-oriented which made them understand the contents of the materials and use these materials accordingly. The respondents were satisfied with the objectives because they can foresee the function of the materials for the proper implementation of the Home-schooling Program for the out-of-school youths. In addition, the respondents had vividly understood the purpose of the materials because of the objectives of the materials.

Pre-assessment
In overall ratings, the respondents were very satisfied with the pre-assessment most especially the implementers and the facilitating teachers for them to better implement the program with the clienteles. It is very important to make a pre-assessment clear, specific and suited to the learners in order to address some problems that may arise in the near future.

Content
In evaluating the content, the respondents were very particular with the understandability and structural analysis of the sentence patterns for the betterment of the learnings that the learners can accumulate.
8.4 Activities/Assignments
Inclusion of activities with clearly stated instructions is one the most important considerations that the respondents were looking after for a better understanding of the lessons and come up with generalizations.

Post-assessment
Post-assessment gave an impression of importance because according to the respondents these will indicate the next strategies and methods to be used for the next lesson or to prepare remediation for the previous lesson. It is the signal if the lesson is still needed to be continued or pause for a while a make some remedial instructions.

Methods and Strategies
Methods and strategies in accordance with the interviews conducted by the researcher, the respondents have so many considerations in order to encourage and motivate the students to attend sessions. It is clearly stated that regular attendance of the students is still the most effective to acquire the most learnings they need to level up.

Needs and Problems
Hence, this study can provide solutions to the problems which were encountered by the curriculum developers and implementers of the educational programs. An educational system which is developed hand-in-hand by the developers, implementers, clienteles and the stakeholders will build a stronger program for the enhancement with results of the educational system in the Philippines.

RECOMMENDATION
Inputs
Program Objectives
Objective Statements
The objectives should have a wider range of possibility for the achievement of excellence.

It should have a clearer grammar construction for the better understanding of the lessons.

These should emphasize the needs of the students intertwined with the curriculum guidelines.

More objectives are needed to be evaluated by using the SMART (Specific, Measureable, Attainable, Result-oriented and Time-bound) technique.

Teachers
Trainings related to Home School
The implementers should update every now and then the program implementation through seeking of memorandums, erratum and addendums coming from the national, regional and division offices.

Provide budget for the trainings of the teachers to attend seminar, workshops and trainings in the national and international organizations conducting programs alike and align to the home-schooling program.
Outsource materials through sending coordinators and facilitating teachers in conventions related to home-schooling program.

Send facilitating teachers through trainings regarding research consortiums regarding Alternative Learning Systems and Alternative Delivery Mode.
Specialization
Implementers should evaluate first the teachers to teach in the Home-schooling through credentials and merit assessment.

Implementers should include psychological assessment through the help of the guidance and counselling unit for the implementation of the Home-schooling Program.

Intensify the moral integration through the different subjects which are to be taught in the implementation of the program.

Materials
Learning Materials/ Modules
Inform the key officials of the needs and present the on-going program through documentation for the better understanding of the needs of the materials in the implementation of the program.

Formulate extension programs to generate materials which are important to magnify the very essence of the program.

Teachers should provide assessment of the materials together with the status to be submitted to the implementers and officials for their awareness.

Status of the Learning Materials/ Modules
Monitoring scheme should be formulated by the implementing schools to be submitted to the key officials for their awareness.

Generate funds through outsourcing to Non-governmental Organizations, Local Government Units and Charitable institutions for the additional materials.

Evaluation of the materials should also be considered to avoid errors through validation of the experts and other people concern.

Process
Methods and Strategies
Facilitating teachers should continue to explore and take time to search for alternative remediation for the betterment of the strategies and methods in teaching subjects for the Home-schooling program.

Conduct researches to rejuvenate the needs of the program most especially in articulating the strategies and methods of teaching.

Through proper evaluation and assessment of the program remove duplicated ideas, concepts, strategies and methods implemented by the traditional system to improve and add trends.