The Middle East has been largely shaped by foreign powers since the fall of the Ottoman Empire

The Middle East has been largely shaped by foreign powers since the fall of the Ottoman Empire. Foreign powers have divided territories, created nations, and have also started and deepened hostile rivalries in the area. Consequently, much of the Middle East has been riddled with religious and sectarian violence. However, as tensions in the area continue to intensify, many of the same decisive foreign powers remain actively engaged, or in proximity for an additional intervention.

The death toll in Iraq continues to rise since the western invasion in 2003. Similarly, as the death toll in Syria continues to soar, we ask if foreign powers should continue to intervene militarily, or do lessons learned from Libya, or Afghanistan, where foreign forces aim to withdraw with the Taliban largely undefeated, suggest foreign powers should refrain from any form of military intervention in the region and allow the country in question to control its own impending future.